US Bans Passengers Of Middle Eastern Airlines From Bringing Electronics On Planes

Phillip Butler
March 21, 2017

Passengers traveling to the USA from certain countries will no longer be allowed to bring carry their laptops, tablets and other portable electronic devices with them on their flights, according to new rules set to go into effect Tuesday.

Prior to the Reuters report, representatives for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Transportation Security Administration (TSA) told Newsweek to direct its inquiry to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, though a TSA representative acknowledged the agency was aware of the Royal Jordanian tweet.

These changes are as a result of a security concern relating to passengers on non-stop flights from certain Middle Eastern countries, an unnamed USA official told CNN's Jon Ostrower.

All personal electronics, apart from cellphones, have been banned on flights to the U.S. from 13 countries. The Qatar Airways booking agent I talked to was clearly unaware of any potential electronics ban on her airline, for example.


United States authorities will no longer allow travelers from 13 African and Middle Eastern countries to bring computer and laptops into airplane cabins anymore, two news agencies have reported. The ban comes into effect starting March 21 and airlines are expected to comply within 96 hours.

Based at Queen Alia International Airport in Amman, Royal Jordanian operates more than 500 flights a week across the globe.

Royal Jordanian has since confirmed that the new rules will apply to Canadian customers flying from Montreal to Amman, as well. Of a dozen foreign airlines contacted Monday afternoon, Royal Jordanian was the only one to publicly detail such a prohibition on electronics.

That means passengers on these flights will have to put their laptops, tablets, Kindles and portable game consoles into their checked baggage for the foreseeable future. The carrier announced Monday the policy would be effective Tuesday.

Other reports by Ligue1talk

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