Facebook wants to fight revenge porn by seeing your nudes

Phillip Butler
November 9, 2017

Facebook is testing a counterintuitive new approach to fighting revenge porn by asking users to voluntarily send in their own nude photos, USA Today reported Wednesday. Facebook then arranges for you to send the photos to yourself via Messenger.

The Australia Brodcasting Corporations (ABC) reports Facebook is partnering with the Australia Government's Office of the eSafety Commissioner for the pilot test.

The process is meant to stop the image ever appearing on Facebook, whoever tries to upload it, by using the Facebook AI technologies used in photo and face matching on the social platform.

It will store a "fingerprint" of images to prevent any copies of them being shared by disgruntled ex-lovers.

Facebook will store these images for a short period of time before deleting them to ensure it is enforcing the policy correctly, the company said.

Rather than sharing the images you would like to protect with Facebook, you would instead share them with yourself via Messenger. Once that's done, every photo like that one will be unable to be uploaded to Facebook.


All one has got to do is to contact Australia's e-Safety Commissioner (since right now they are trying this in Australia) if they're anxious about the fact that their images might get leaked. Further instances of the images appearing on Facebook will then be reflexively blocked. The sender is then also recommended to delete the image.

Two years ago, Twitter and Reddit cracked down on revenge porn, banning the practice on both platforms. Four percent of internet users have fallen victim to it, and 10 percent of women under 30 have had someone threaten to post explicit photos of them online against their will, according to a 2016 study by Data & Society.

This has led some security experts to warn that more needs to be done to combat revenge porn, particularly in terms of education.

"With its billions of users, Facebook is one place where many offenders aggress because they can maximize the harm by broadcasting the nonconsensual porn to those most close to the victim".

Facebook promises that your naked selfies will be safe with it; it has said that it will not store users' photos on any of its servers.

While giving users the power to get ahead of abusers by preemptively uploading any media they don't want shared online isn't inherently bad, requiring a stranger to look at the uncensored content leaves a lot of room for improvement.

Other reports by Ligue1talk

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