SpaceX 'not to blame' for missing spy satellite By

Tammy Harvey
January 14, 2018

However, the company has not specified if the Zuma payload was "successfully" deployed in the orbit.

"Since the data reviewed so far indicates that no design, operational or other changes are needed, we do not anticipate any impact on the upcoming launch schedule".

An article in Wired said that Northrop Grumman provided the adapter to mate Zuma to the Falcon 9.

As critics were quick to call SpaceX's reliability into question, the company rolled its new powerful rocket, the Falcon Heavy, onto the same launchpad at the Kennedy Space Center that hoisted the Apollo astronauts to the moon.

On launch day, safely tucked away in a protective payload fairing will be Musk's 2008 Tesla Roadster, an all-electric sports auto that boosted his energy company during its formative years.

"They know the Falcon 9 well", said Larson, who formerly worked at SpaceX and was a senior advisor for space and innovation in the Obama administration.

Also, the future flights of SpaceX will remain scheduled as they were.

Shotwell's statement emailed to reporters was an unusual one for SpaceX, which rarely comments on planned Falcon 9 flights before the week of launch.


And if the test fire and demonstration flight are successful, SpaceX's manifest will open up to new capabilities thanks to its ability to take heavier payloads to orbit.

The maker of the billion-dollar Zuma spy satellite, defense contractor Northrop Grumman, refused to comment on the plight of its missing satellite.

SpaceX was certified by the U.S. Air Force in 2015 to carry national security satellites, a move that broke up a longtime and lucrative monopoly held by a joint venture of Boeing Co. and

The GovSat 1 satellite is set to launch on the next Falcon 9 rocket mission.

The NRO and military agencies typically acknowledge their ownership of clandestine satellites, even if details about their missions remain under a shroud of secrecy. Rumours have arisen that the mission was carrying a spy satellite of Pentagon and that it even had the capability to fix other satellites.

But with the mission's classified nature, confirmation of Zuma's fate, and what may have gone wrong, remained elusive.

SpaceX launches Zuma from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on January 7.

Other reports by Ligue1talk

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